The Knidian Aphrodite

"14. Europa's kiss is sweet though it reach only to the lips, though it but lightly touch the mouth. But she touches not with the edge of the lips; with her mouth cleaving close she drains the soul from the finger-tips.

15. Where is now Praxiteles? Where are the hands of Polycleitus, that gave life to the works of ancient art? Who shall mould Melite's scented ringlets, or her fiery eyes and the splendour of her neck? Where are the modellers, the carvers in stone? Such beauty, like the image of a god, deserved a temple."

RUFINUS, From the Greek Anthology, book V, Loeb Ed.

A Tumblr about the NUDE & the BODY, especially FEMALE.
bayoread:

Ερινυς - Erinys
Ερινυες - Erinyes
TISIPHONE (the avenging), MEGAIRA (the grudging), ALEKTO (the angry).
Three netherworld goddesses who avenged crimes against the natural order. They were particularly concerned with homicide, unfilial conduct, crimes against the gods, and perjury. A victim seeking justice could call down the curse of the Erinyes upon the criminal. The most powerful of these was the curse of the parent upon the child (such examples include Orestes and Oedipus)—for the Erinyes were born of just such a crime, being sprung from the blood of Ouranos, when he was castrated by his son Kronos.
The wrath of the Erinyes manifested itself in a number of ways. The most severe of these was the tormenting madness inflicted upon a person guilty patricide or matricide. Murderers might suffer illness or disease; and a nation harbouring such a criminal, could suffer death, and with it hunger and disease. The wrath of the Erinyes could only be placated with the right ritual purification and the completion of some task assigned for atonement.
The goddesses were also servants of Haides and Persephone in the underworld where they oversaw the torture of criminals consigned to the Dungeons of the Damned.
The Erinyes were similar to if not the same as the Poinai (Retaliations), Arai (Curses), Praxidikai (Exacters of Justice) and Maniai (Madnesses).
They were depicted as ugly, winged women with hair, arms and waists entwined with poisonous serpents. They wielded whips and were clothed either in the long black robes of mourners, or the short-length skirts and boots of huntress- maidens.
(Painting above The Remorse of Orestes by William Adolphe Bouguereau, 1862.)

bayoread:

Ερινυς - Erinys

Ερινυες - Erinyes

TISIPHONE (the avenging), MEGAIRA (the grudging), ALEKTO (the angry).

Three netherworld goddesses who avenged crimes against the natural order. They were particularly concerned with homicide, unfilial conduct, crimes against the gods, and perjury. A victim seeking justice could call down the curse of the Erinyes upon the criminal. The most powerful of these was the curse of the parent upon the child (such examples include Orestes and Oedipus)—for the Erinyes were born of just such a crime, being sprung from the blood of Ouranos, when he was castrated by his son Kronos.

The wrath of the Erinyes manifested itself in a number of ways. The most severe of these was the tormenting madness inflicted upon a person guilty patricide or matricide. Murderers might suffer illness or disease; and a nation harbouring such a criminal, could suffer death, and with it hunger and disease. The wrath of the Erinyes could only be placated with the right ritual purification and the completion of some task assigned for atonement.

The goddesses were also servants of Haides and Persephone in the underworld where they oversaw the torture of criminals consigned to the Dungeons of the Damned.

The Erinyes were similar to if not the same as the Poinai (Retaliations), Arai (Curses), Praxidikai (Exacters of Justice) and Maniai (Madnesses).

They were depicted as ugly, winged women with hair, arms and waists entwined with poisonous serpents. They wielded whips and were clothed either in the long black robes of mourners, or the short-length skirts and boots of huntress- maidens.

(Painting above The Remorse of Orestes by William Adolphe Bouguereau, 1862.)

(via faery-tales-and-nightmares)

crushalltheraspberries:

Cupid and Psyche
Le Ravissement de Psyché (1895) William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Psyche et L’Amour (1889) William-Adolphe Bouguereau
L’amour et Psyché (1899) William-Adolphe Bouguereau
Cupid et Psyché (1893) Lionel Noel Royer
Cupid and Psyche is a story from the Latin novel Metamorphoses written in the 2nd century AD by Apuleius. It concerns the overcoming of obstacles to the love between Psyche and Cupid, and their ultimate union in marriage. Although the only extended narrative from antiquity is that of Apuleius, Eros and Psyche appear in Greek art as early as the 4th century BC. The story has been retold in poetry, drama, and opera, and depicted widely in painting, sculpture, and even wallpaper. [x]

(via the-wolf-and-the-mockingbird)